Looking for our new site?

Literacy and Reading

Hitting a Triple: States Winning 3 Federal Grants that Could Improve Education from Birth to Third Grade

June 27, 2012

Read the headlines about the federal government’s early education competitions among states, and you might think there is only one game in town: the Early Learning Challenge that is part of Obama’s signature education reform initiative, Race to the Top.

But three other statewide grants could also have an impact on children’s learning in early childhood from birth through third grade: Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy grants; Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) grants; and the original Race to the Top, which is labeled a K-12 program and therefore explicitly includes the K-3 grades and could implicitly impact public schools’ pre-K programs as well.

Federal Actions and PreK-3rd Reforms: Where, How and Why They Should Fit Together

June 14, 2012

On May 11, 2012, Lisa Guernsey gave a talk at Harvard University's PreK-3rd Institute on the federal government's role so far in reforming early education to enable better alignment across the pre-K, kindergarten, first, second and third grades (PreK-3rd). The presentation examines the Obama Administration's top-level education agenda and its early learning policies and describes how new and existing federal programs and funding streams are influencing the work of states and school districts in creating better early education systems for young children.

Podcast: Going Beyond Third-Grade Retention to Help Struggling Readers

April 30, 2012
Publication Image

Early educators and child advocates continue to stress the importance of children learning to read by the end of third grade.  Legislators in several states are signaling their interest in this too by proposing third-grade retention policies that keep children from graduating to fourth grade until they can pass a reading test. Is this a smart approach?

Going Beyond Third-Grade Retention to Help Struggling Readers

April 30, 2012

Early educators and child advocates continue to stress the importance of children learning to read by the end of third grade.  Legislators in several states are signaling their interest in this too by proposing third-grade retention policies that keep children from graduating to fourth grade until they can pass a reading test. Is this a smart approach?

How the Common Core Standards Could Help Restore the Curriculum

May 14, 2012

More than 80 percent of elementary school teachers, grades 3 through 5, report that they are spending more learning time on math or language arts at the expense of other subjects. This is one of the most disconcerting findings from a recent survey of 1,000 3rd through 12th grade public school teachers commissioned by Common Core, a DC-based non-profit that promotes content-rich curricula and instruction.

Screen Time: Surprises and Suggestions from the Science on Kids' Media

April 12, 2012

On April 10, Lisa Guernsey gave a presentation to the Falls Church PTA on what the latest science is telling parents and educators about the benefits and drawbacks of screen media for children, ages 0 to 8. The presentation was based in part on new research in Screen Time: How Electronic Media -- From Baby Videos to Educational Software -- Affects Your Young Child (Basic Books, 2012).

Starting Early With English Language Learners: Paper Examines Illinois's New Approach

April 11, 2012
Publication Image

English Language Learners are a large and growing population in America’s public school system, but schools often fall short in preparing these students for success in college and the workforce. For a while now, we've had our eyes on one state, Illinois, that has tried to reverse that trend by starting services for young English Language Learners before they arrive in kindergarten.

Illinois is in the process of expanding its services for English Language Learners into state-funded pre-K, so that students begin receiving ELL support when they first arrive in school, whether that is at age 3, 4, or 5.  Our new policy paper, Starting Early with English Language Learners: First Lessons From Illinois, takes a deep look at how Illinois came to see a need for new policies for its burgeoning population of English Language Learners, and why focusing on its youngest English Language Learners was the state’s next step.

Starting Early With English Language Learners

  • By
  • Maggie Severns,
  • New America Foundation
April 11, 2012

English Language Learners are a large and growing population in America’s public school system, but schools often fall short in preparing these students for success in college and the workforce. A new policy paper from the Early Education Initiative of the New America Foundation focuses on one state, Illinois, that is taking a different approach: building English Language Learner services that begin as early as pre-K to ensure that all students, regardless of their age, are supported in school.

E-Books: Can They Improve Students' Reading Comprehension?

April 5, 2012

On March 14, 2012, Lisa Guernsey gave two presentations at the New York State Educational Media and Technology Association's annual meeting. The first, "E-Books: Can They Improve Students' Reading Comprehension?," highlights the emerging research revolving around questions of whether electronic books, especially electronic picture books for young children, can be helpful or harmful as students learn to read.

Screen Time

March 20, 2012
A science journalist and mother of two, Guernsey manages to extricate straightforward information and guidelines from the morass of research, articles and debates on screen media and child brain development. Easily digestible chapters are smartly structured around 12 pervasive concerns of interviewees from all walks of life. Guernsey explains how parents can shrewdly navigate a TV, DVD and video game market that has only begun developing its potential, much like the minds of the children it targets.
Syndicate content